Housing Australia

The great Australian dream of owning your own home has prevailed for more than half a century but with surging house prices in some parts of Australia, there has been much debate about whether it will continue. Historically low interest rates, an unprecedented period of continuous economic growth and strong levels of migration have contributed to increasing demand and escalating housing prices in Australia’s capital cities. This policy perspective examines:Housing trends in Australia;The experience of Australia’s housing sector compared with other countries in the OECD;Supply of housing: from land availability to changes in the composition of housing stock;Drivers of demand and possible policy levers; andThe intergenerational consequences of high housing costs and falling home ownership.

Source: Housing Australia

How governments have widened the gap between generations in home ownership

Various government policies have fuelled the demand for housing over time, expanding the wealth of older home owners and pushing it further and further beyond the reach of young would-be home buyers. A new study highlights this divide between millennials and their boomer parents.The study is part of a Committee of Economic Development of Australia (CEDA) report called Housing Australia. It compares trends in property ownership across age groups over a period of three decades.Between 1982 and 2013, the share of home owners among 25-34 year olds shrunk the most, by more than 20%. On the other hand, the share of home owners among those aged 65+ years has risen slightly.The rate of renting has spiralled among young people. By 2013, renting had outstripped home ownership among 25-34 year olds.

Source: How governments have widened the gap between generations in home ownership

Tax Office reveals size of underpayment of super for the first time

There is a $2.85 billion-a-year shortfall in what employers should be paying their employees in super.For the first time, the Tax Office has estimated the shortfall by comparing what employers should be paying with how much actually ends up in the super funds of their employees.

Source: Tax Office reveals size of underpayment of super for the first time

Driverless lorries could mean 600,000 lost jobs. It’s time we took a universal basic income seriously. | Evolve Politics

With trials for self-driving commercial lorries to take place in the UK within the next twelve months, the work days of thousands of Britain’s long-haul drivers may soon be numbered.Of course, these are only preliminary tests – it may well be a decade or more before driverless deliveries and long-distance haulage are an everyday reality. However, with the beginnings already upon us, a boom in automated jobs is surely coming sooner rather than later.

Source: Driverless lorries could mean 600,000 lost jobs. It’s time we took a universal basic income seriously. | Evolve Politics

The great unpaid super swindle | The Saturday Paper

 

Employers are denying their workers almost $3 billion in unpaid superannuation each year, according to new estimates from the Australian Tax Office. The ATO believes employers have withheld $17 billion in super since 2009, and that the practice is becoming more widespread. The office has also admitted its own shortcomings in catching non-compliant businesses, revealing it has only been able to detect and secure $3 billion worth of super in the same timeframe. The revelations come after pressure from the industry super sector, which published its own research last year highlighting the scale of the problem. A Senate inquiry report into unpaid super released in May, creatively titled Superbad, found the ATO’s “current approach” to tackling super non-payment was “inadequate”.

Source: The great unpaid super swindle | The Saturday Paper

The Future Of Work And The Social Welfare State’s Survival

Is Your Property Investment Future Proof?

Clickworkers An acquaintance, Lutz, gave me a tour of his co-working space in his Neukölln neighborhood in Berlin, where he and a dozen other digital entrepreneurs rent out little cubicles, share office expenses and network. Lutz and his colleagues are called ‚clickworkers’ because they work over the internet for anybody who hires them for their particular specialty– software development, computer programming, data management, web and graphic design, translation, copy editing and more.

Source: The Future Of Work And The Social Welfare State’s Survival

Pfizer corporate rorts

Pfizer And The Dutch Sandwich |  Corporate Rorts, The Real Reason Government Services Are Poor

Its Time To Get Angry, Very Angry!!!

Pfizer rorts Pfizer rorts

Michael West exposes Pfizer! See exactly how they steal from the public and pharmaceutical benefits scheme laundering it overseas

This ring-a-ring-a-rosy has all the hallmarks of a transaction designed to create almost a billion dollars in losses which can be used for tax purposes in Australia. The Australian company has “invested” almost a billion dollars into two companies which were suddenly liquidated — with no value left for shareholders. Nothing is heard of them since.

It brings to mind the infamous Bottom of the Harbour tax schemes of the 1980s where the financial engineers – facilitated by the top end of the accounting community – made investments in companies, stripped those companies of their assets and left nothing for the taxman.

Source: Dear Pfizer, pay it back | Michael West

Transforming Healthcare to Homecare – Ericsson ConsumerLab

Healthcare becomes decentralized, moving from hospitals towards homes

Consumers are frustrated with inconveniences and doctor wait times; 39 percent of chronic patients prefer online consultations to face-to-face meetings. Close to two in three consumers say wearables that monitor and administer medication are important to better manage chronic ailments,leading to reduced visits to the doctor. More than half of cross-industry decision makers feel decentralizing healthcare to local centers will improve efficiency and address resource scarcity.


Patient data is centralized, turning hospitals into data centers

35 percent of consumers say that online access to a central repository of medical records will help them easily manage the quality and efficiency of their care; 45 percent of cross-industry experts consider the central repository as a breakthrough in healthcare provisioning. Access to patient data is considered important to improve healthcare. Doctors will become data scientists and data security will become paramount, as 46 percent of cross-industry decision makers already consider data security to be an issue.

Source: Transforming Healthcare to Homecare – Ericsson ConsumerLab

Ericsson – remote healthcare with King’s College

It won’t belong until healthcare is wired into your home.

The ability to reach out across space and physically interact with a person or object on the other side of the planet isn’t just a new technological concept – it’s something the human race has simply never been able to do before.

Although the use of tactile internet in healthcare has the potential to completely revolutionize how patients and doctors interact, the horizontal application of the technology is much wider, even within healthcare.

For example, senior doctors and teachers will be able to use tactile connections with students in faraway places to demonstrate surgical techniques, or to coach diagnosis methods. Someone with impaired vision could even use the equipment to add physical context to an audio/visual experience, bringing another dimension of sensory stimulation into the picture.

Source: Ericsson – remote healthcare with King’s College